Supporting Amateur Radio Emergency Communications

US Flag4th of July & Deceased presidents

The 4th is commonly referred to as the birth of a nation, in this case America and we celebrate it with a national holiday and all it’s trappings on July 4th, the date Declaration of Independence was signed by the founding fathers.

QUESTION:

Coincidentally two founding fathers also died on this date.  Who are the two?

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VanityFees-300x165The FCC has found that it costs the agency more to process the regulatory fees for amateur radio vanity call signs and other services such as GMRS than the fees themselves cover. Rather than increasing the rate, the FCC has decided to eliminate them altogether. This change will not go into effect until the required congressional notice has been given, which typically takes at least 90 days. Any fees paid prior to the institution of the change will not be refunded. This is great news and a welcome change from the tedious fee recovery process that has been normal.

From the ARRL:

The FCC is eliminating the regulatory fee to apply for an Amateur Radio vanity call sign. The change will not go into effect, however, until required congressional notice has been given. This will take at least 90 days. As the Commission explained in a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, Report and Order, and Order (MD Docket 14-92 and others), released May 21, it’s a matter of simple economics.

“The Commission spends more resources on processing the regulatory fees and issuing refunds than the amount of the regulatory fee payment,” the FCC said. “As our costs now exceed the regulatory fee, we are eliminating this regulatory fee category.” The current vanity call sign regulatory fee is $21.40, the highest in several years. The FCC reported there were 11,500 “payment units” in FY 2014 and estimated that it would collect nearly $246,100.

In its 2014 Notice of Proposed Rule Making (NPRM) regarding the assessment and collection of regulatory fees for FY 2014, the FCC had sought comment on eliminating several smaller regulatory fee categories, such as those for vanity call signs and GMRS. It concluded in the subsequent Report and Order (R&O) last summer, however, that it did not have “adequate support to determine whether the cost of recovery and burden on small entities outweighed the collected revenue or whether eliminating the fee would adversely affect the licensing process.”

The FCC said it has since had an opportunity to obtain and analyze support concerning the collection of the regulatory fees for Amateur Vanity and GMRS, which the FCC said comprise, on average, more than 20,000 licenses that are newly obtained or renewed, every 10 and 5 years, respectively.

“The Commission often receives multiple applications for the same vanity call sign, but only one applicant can be issued that call sign,” the FCC explained. “In such cases, the Commission issues refunds for all the remaining applicants. In addition to staff and computer time to process payments and issue refunds, there is an additional expense to issue checks for the applicants who cannot be refunded electronically.”

The Commission said that after it provides the required congressional notification, Amateur Radio vanity program applicants “will no longer be financially burdened with such payments, and the Commission will no longer incur these administrative costs that exceed the fee payments. The revenue that the Commission would otherwise collect from these regulatory fee categories will be proportionally assessed on other wireless fee categories.”

The FCC said it would not issue refunds to licensees who paid the regulatory fee prior to its official elimination.

The TRW swap meet located at Northrop Grumman in Redondo Beach will continue to be in Redondo Beach through December 2014.

Check W6TRW website for more details

Early RCA Color TVOn this date in history, June 25, 1951, CBS broadcast the very first commercial color TV program. Unfortunately, nearly no one could watch it on their black-and-white televisions. This first color program was a variety show called, “Premiere.” The show featured such celebrities as Ed Sullivan, Garry Moore, and Arthur Godfrey.

 

Despite early successes with color programming, the adoption to color television was a slow one.

QUESTION:

In what year did the American public finally start purchasing more color TV sets than black-and-white ones?

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Photo: AP Photo

Photo: AP Photo

Question

How many times has President Obama visited the Greater Los Angeles area during his presidency including today’s visit?

Answer

22 times

Explanation

The visit will be Obama’s 22nd to Los Angeles and Orange counties as president. He has attended fundraisers during 18 of his previous 21 visits to Los Angeles and Orange County as president, attending 32 fundraisers in Los Angeles County on those trips, occasionally attending multiple fundraisers during the same visit.

By City News Service

NET CHECK-INS:

33 check-ins tonight

Thank you taking part in the net and special thank you to Gary W6NVY for allowing us the use of the repeater.

American Flag on MoonFlag Day will be celebrated on June 14th. It commemorates the adoption of the flag of the United States on that day in 1777. So, in honor of Flag Day, here’s a flag trivia question.

Question

How many American Flags are there on the moon?

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summer solsticeBecause the Earth is tilted 23.4 degrees the noon sun appears to rise and fall in the sky over the course of the year. In the Northern Hemisphere, the sun will reach its northernmost point in the sky – known as the summer solstice – on Saturday June 21st, marking the official first day of summer.  It is also the longest day of the year.

QUESTION:

In hours, minutes and seconds, how long is the longest day of the year?   In other words, how much time is there between sunrise and sunset here in Los Angeles on the longest day of the year?

(Remember, don’t cheat by looking up the answer. Just give us your best guess.  Also, Price is Right rules are in effect, so the person who is closest to the correct answer without going over will be the winner).

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